E-Mail: peterlourie@gmavt.net

Iditarod Exercises

 for Grades 3-6

from

Debbie Glessner

Former Librarian, Hillcrest Elementary School,

Council Rock School District,

Holland, PA

 

 

 

IDITAROD 2010 (applies to any year)

NAME: ______________________________________________________

Homeroom Teacher:  ____________________________________________

INSTRUCTIONAL GOALS:

  • To coordinate library skills, technology skills, and literature enrichment with an historic event run annually in Alaska.
  • To give the students experience in tracking daily information through the internet.
  • To give the students experience in creating a brochure on PUBLISHER.
  • To reinforce research skills
  • To encourage the reading of Gary Paulsen titles.
  • To write poetry about a specific topic.
  • To reinforce informative writing skills.

GENERAL TIME FRAME SCHEDULE

Week of February 14

Grade 3:              Read MUSH by Patricia Seibert

Grade 4:              Read MUSH by Patricia Seibert

Grade 5:              Read The Great Serum Race by Debbie Miller

Grade 6:              Read The Great Serum Race by Debbie Miller

Week of February 21

Grade 3:              Read Akiak by Robert J. Blake

Grade 4:              Read Akiak by Robert J. Blake

Grade 5:              Read from Puppies, Dogs, and Blue Northers by Gary Paulsen

Grade 6:              Read from Puppies, Dogs, and Blue Northers by Gary Paulsen

Week of February 28

Grade 3:              Introduce Iditarod project and draw musher names

Grade 4:              Introduce Iditarod project and draw musher names

Grade 5:              Introduce Iditarod project and draw musher names

Grade 6:              Introduce Iditarod project and draw musher names

Week of March 7  (race begins on March 5th)

Grade 3:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

Grade 4:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

                            “Poetry on the Trail”

Grade 5:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

                            “Iditarod Brochure”  and Gary Paulsen

Grade 6:               Track musher and record data (sequencing)

                            “Iditarod Wall”  and Gary Paulsen

Week of March 14

Grade 3:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

Grade 4:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

                            “Poetry on the Trail”

Grade 5:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

                            “Iditarod Brochure”  and Gary Paulsen

Grade 6:               Track musher and record data (sequencing)

                            “Iditarod Wall”  and Gary Paulsen

Week of March 21

Grade 3:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

Grade 4:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

Grade 5:              Track musher and record data (sequencing)

                            “Iditarod Brochure”  and Gary Paulsen

Grade 6:               Track musher and record data (sequencing)

                            “Iditarod Wall”  and Gary Paulsen

Week of March 28

              Wrap up loose ends and close out Iditarod Project

MEDIA:

Videotape of DOGSONG by Gary Paulsen

Videotape titled  SEASON OF THE SLED DOG shown on PBS  about the Iditarod

             

IDITAROD BROCHURE  (5th grade)

              You will create a tri-fold brochure using PUBLISHER.  The following information is required.  If there is extra space left over, you may use your imagination and add extra pictures or information related to your musher or the Iditarod race.

REQUIRED INFORMATION:

History of the Iditarod

  • What is another name for the race?
  • What was the Iditarod trail originally?
  • What happened in 1925?
  • When was the first Iditarod race run?
  • Who was the winner of the first Iditarod?
  • How long did it take the dog team to finish the first Iditarod race?
  • How many miles is the race?
  • Where does the race start and finish?

Other facts you would like to include

A Biography of your Musher

      1.  Name

      2.  Hometown

      3.  Age

      4.  How long has he/she been mushing?

      5.  Hobbies or interests

      6.  Job

Picture of your musher if available

Other facts about your musher

Information about the 2010 trail

  • What route does the trail follow in 2010?  Why?
  • Select three check points and answer these questions about each check point.

+  Name of check point

+  How many miles from Anchorage?

+  How many miles to Nome?

+  Population of the checkpoint

+  Any interesting facts about the checkpoint

Some Iditarod Rules

  • What is the maximum number of dogs that a musher may start the race with?
  • How many dogs must be on the towline at the finish of the race?
  • What is the GOOD SAMARITAN rule?  (see rule 21)
  • What is NO MAN’S LAND?  (see rule 33)
  • How much did it cost to enter the 2010 Iditarod race?  (see rule 39)

Sled Dog facts

  • What breeds of dogs are used mostly for dog-sled racing?
  • When do puppies start training?
  • What do the terms Hike, Gee, Haw, and Easy mean?
  • Why were the sled dogs Togo and Balto famous?
  • Other facts of interest to you

2010 IDITAROD WALL  (6th grade)

         The Iditarod Wall will be a class effort with each student contributing something to the wall.  There are TALKING WALLS all over the world which tell stories.  Our Iditarod Wall will tell the story of the 2010 race as it unfolds.

Some things that should be included on the IDITAROD WALL.

Map of Alaska

State Motto

Statehood date

Origin of the name ALASKA

Map of the 2010 Iditarod trail

Alaska’s state flag

Inuksuit sculptures

Eskimo (Inuit) facts

Eskimo mask

History of the Iditarod

Pictures of the mushers and dog teams

Brief biographical facts about the mushers

Age

Residence

Dog sled racing experience

Facts about the trail and checkpoints

Facts and pictures of animals that may be seen on the trail

OTHER IDEAS?

POETRY ON THE TRAIL (4th grade)

       There are several different types of poetry formats which you might like to experiment with when writing a poem about the Iditarod or something related to Alaska, nature on the trail, or dog-sledding.

1. ACROSTIC Poetry  (FUN and not too difficult) – In an acrostic poem, the first letter of each line spells the word that your poem is about.  First Letter of each line should be larger and BOLD.

LEAF

Lingering after the last frost,

Each single leaf flutters slowly

As it releases the branch to

Fall to the ground.                                                                      Deborah Glessner  2010

2. SHAPE Poetry  (FUN)  – A type of  visual poem in which the poem takes the shape of the subject of the poem.  Example: if the poem were about a fish, then it would be in the shape of a fish.  Designing a shape poem can be fun, but be careful not to choose a subject that would be too difficult.  We suggest you map out or draw your shape first and then importing your text into the shape.

LUNA

You

  were my

     first dandelion

       wish, my cotton

         candy kiss, and sweet

          lullaby.  With you nested

           in the palm of my hand,

            we became one with the night,

             ruling over the stars in the sky.

            You have been my guiding light

           through sleepless nights, my

          muse, and friend, always

        lending a listening ear, and

      offering your soft, glowing

     light to ease my fears.

   You are my warm,

  goodnight moon,

 Luna.                                                                                        Marie Summers  2003

3. PALINDROME Poetry (Challenging) --  Also called Mirrored Poetry.  A palindrome is a word, phrase, sentence, or a poem that reads the same forward and backwards.  It is important that the poem makes sense either forward or backward.

REFLECTIONS

Life –

imitates nature,

always moving, traveling continuously.

Falling leaves placed delicately;

foliage touching the echoing waters,

clarity removed –

Reflections distorted through waves rippling;

gracefully dancing

mirrored images

  • reflect –

images mirrored.

Dancing gracefully,

rippling waves through distorted reflections –

removed clarity.

Waters echoing the touching foliage;

delicately placed leaves falling –

continuously traveling, moving always,

nature imitates

life.

                            Lynne C. Fadden 2002

4. CLARITY PYRAMID Poem (Difficult) --  A Clarity Pyramid poem consists of two triplets and a single line (7 lines total).  This poem should be centered when typed.

The first triplet has 1, then 2, and then 3 syllables.  The title of the poem is the one-syllable word of the first triplet – display in all capital letters.  This line is followed by a two-syllable line, and then the third line is a three syllable line. These first three lines clarify the definition of the poem or are synonyms for the title.

The second triplet has 5, then 6, then 7 syllables.  These lines should be about something in life which gives a poetic view or outlook of the title.

The last line is 8 syllables and is in quotation marks as this line should be a quot that defines the first word, the title.

CLARITY Pyramid Poem example:

PAINT

Pigment

Colorings

Childhood memory

Coated in bright layers

With a daisy border dream

“milky morsels plucked from rainbows”

                                                                                   

                                                        Marie Summers   2002

5.Haiku Poetry  (Fun and slightly challenging)  – Haiku is a Japanese poetry form.  It is an unrhymed verse consisting of three unrhymed lines of 5, 7, and 5 syllables – 17 syllables in all.  Haiku is usually written in the present and is about nature.

Pink cherry blossoms  (5 syllables

Cast shimmering reflections    (7 syllables)

On seas of Japan     (5 syllables)                                       ©Andrea

 

IDITAROD – Tracking your musher instructions     (3rd Grade)

Starting Monday, March 7, each child should check his/her musher’s progress in the IDITAROD dog-sled race which started on Saturday, March 5th.

The children can check and record the musher’s race progress at home or in school, whatever is easiest.

Use this as a guide to locating the information needed for the MUSHER RECORD SHEET.

Note the date – start with March 7th and daily after that.

Log online at this address:

www.IDITAROD.com

On the left hand side, click on RACE UPDATES

Use the information given here under CURRENT STANDINGS to find out the musher’s place in the race for that day (example: 10th place, etc.) You will also find the last checkpoint they passed. Write this down on your RECORD SHEET.

You may be able to find the number # of dogs still on the team on this page. 

To find out the number of miles go back to the Iditarod homepage and click on TRAIN INFORMATION.  Then click on “Southern Route”  --  Under the map you will find a list of all the check points and it gives the number of miles traveled from Anchorage as well as the number of miles still to go until they reach Nome.

If your musher withdraws from the race, come to the library to get another musher to track.

 

MUSHER RECORD SHEET

Musher’s Name______________________

DATE     CHECKPOINT    PLACE IN RACE     # OF DOGS    MILES TRAVELED      MILES REMAINING

 

 

IDITAROD

Hillcrest Elementary School – Library Project

You will find most of your information on the internet from these links. There are others, but these are the best.

http://www.iditarod.com

http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/iditarod/

http://www.dogsled.com/

 

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